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  1. #46
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    Some old comments from his tumblr (2003):

    https://www.tumblr.com/brevoorthisto...3?source=share

    All right, then. A column on me and the X-Men.

    My first encounter with the X-Men came in Son Of Origins Of Marvel Comics, the second Fireside Marvel trade paperback of the mid-1970s. After becoming interested in the Fantastic Four, I went to my local library in search of a copy of Origins Of Marvel Comics, having discovered that it reprinted FF #1 among other things. Well, that day Origins was nowhere to be found on the shelves, but Son Of Origins was still in stock. It took a brief cameo by the FF in the first Avengers story, hastily viewed while flipping through the book, to make me decide to check it out.

    So I met the X-Men the same way the rest of the world did, in that first story by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby. The Stan and Jack material was the stuff that most entertained me in Son Of Origins, and so propelled me towards current issues of the same magazines—X-Men and Avengers both. The first actual issue of X-Men I picked up was #108, noteworthy as being John Byrne’s first as artist, and the conclusion to that first New X-Men in Space arc. And let me tell you, it was confusing as hell. Cyclops was the only main character I could recognize from X-Men #1 (though Professor X showed up on the last page), and there was an army of other guys on the stage as well—the Starjammers, the Imperial Guard, the Shi’ar Empire folks, Firelord—and none of them was introduced particularly well. That all said, it was a really good-looking comic book, and it got across the notion that big stakes were involved, even if I couldn’t quite be sure just what those stakes were. And so I became an X-Men reader.

    The landscape of comics was very different in 1978, especially where the X-Men were concerned. It must be hard for most readers of today to comprehend, but at the time not only was there just the one single X-Men title, but it was bimonthly, and had only recently been relaunched with newfangled characters such as Nightcrawler, Wolverine, and Storm, after spending years as a reprint title. Over the last twenty years or so, reading X-Men has come to be de riguer among comic book readers—the one title that everybody reads and everybody talks about. But back then, it wasn’t so, not yet. The event that really changed that was the Death of Phoenix.

    The whole year or so leading up to X-Men #137 was a hell of an exciting run. The characters were rich and vibrant, the artwork was slick and attractive and involving—I know John feels that he’s worlds better as a penciler today, but I find that I can look back at the work he did in this era and still get a tremendous charge out of it, even in stories I hadn’t read at the time. But I think the key element that made X-Men a killer comic book was the fact that these characters were all largely new, and were living their lives out afresh on the pages, each and every month. By this point, Spider-Man and Fantastic Four and everything else was still well-crafted, but they’d kind of calcified into their final forms—you knew exactly what you were going to get out of a Spider-Man comic book by that point, knew where the boundaries were. But that wasn’t the case with the X-Men. Anything was possible with the X-Men, and that gave the series a super-charged atmosphere that other books simply lacked. You never knew what was going to happen, and everything was possible. And that flavor culminated in X-Men #137, in which Jean Grey gave up her life rather than further threaten the cosmos. There was plenty of behind-the-scenes drama leading up to this development—rewrites demanded by Jim Shooter, the wholesale junking of the original script—but the end product undeniably worked. It’s one of the most genuinely moving comic books of its era, and it set the tone for the second stage of X-Men’s growth to dominance.

    Right around that time, the prices for back issues of X-Men began to skyrocket, a phenomenon that had been building for awhile, but really began to take off once #137 hit. X-Men #94 was the only comic book of its era to be valued at $25.00 as a back issue, an incredible price at that time. (For some reason, Giant-Size X-Men #1 was less highly prized, commanding only $20.00.) X-Men became not only a hot series because of its content, but a hot commodity as a collectable, with various readers and dealers actively speculating on the then-current releases. It was the beginning of the speculation bubble that would eventually grow to massive proportions by the early ‘90s, and whose pop signaled the near-demise of the entire industry.

    Shortly thereafter, though, while others began to tout X-Men as the greatest comic book ever, my interest began to wane. Byrne left to do Fantastic Four, but Dave Cockrum was an appropriate replacement—I’d gone back and scarfed up a number of the earlier X-Men issues that Dave had done pre-#108, and liked them an awful lot. And I was quite taken with the work of Paul Smith, who followed Dave on the book. But what I was finding was that the series was changing gears, changing emphasis, and I wasn’t really in tune with where it was going.

    Up through #137, the heart of the book had been the relationship between Cyclops and Phoenix, Scott and Jean. Cyclops was my favorite character in the series at this point, the serious introvert who was nevertheless a natural leader. But after Jean sacrificed herself, the book needed to find a new hook, a new centerpiece. And after some quick trial-and-error, this turned out to be Kitty Pryde, Sprite. I had liked the character in her initial appearances, but once she came to virtually monopolize the title, I found her incredibly annoying. Simultaneously, influenced by television dramas such as “Hill Street Blues,” Chris was adding in a strong element of ambiguity into the stories he was telling. Characters were neither black hats nor white hats exclusively—which could have been exciting, except that he also cribbed the serial style of such shows without their habit of wrapping storylines up. As a result, interesting situations tended to be back-burnered for months, sometimes resurfacing with the characters in wholly different status quos. I sometimes refer to this as the period in which the X-Men stopped being super heroes, and became something else.

    Shortly thereafter, buoyed by the thoroughly-excellent limited series he’d done with Frank Miller, Chris started pushing Wolverine to the center of the series. I had liked Wolverine an awful lot in the early All-New X-Men days, as the spoiler character, the Hawkeye, the guy who causes friction. But once you made him the center, the whole paradigm turned on its head for me. I couldn’t, for example, accept the notion that Wolverine was somehow a better representative of the philosophies of the X-Men than Cyclops, who was now, by default, cast into the role of jerk, of stiff. The Cyclops-Wolverine rivalry worked for me when Logan was the ornery outsider, but failed when he became the X-Men’s moral compass.

    I fell away from the series at this point, though I still kept up with it from time to time (everybody did—as I mentioned earlier, X-Men by this point had become the benchmark comic book, the one against which all others are judged. It’s a position that the title has held to this day.) And it continued to grow bigger, to expand into multiple titles, creating a complex cosmology that was compelling to some, confusing to others. There were moments since then when the book got me interested again for a brief time, but they were few and far between. I just didn’t care for the flavor of the series enough. X-Men by this point had become just as calcified as Spidey or the FF had been in 1978, a well-crafted series in which the boundaries are well-known and immutable, a series that had to work extra hard to convince you that something significant was about to happen, rather than just having it occur.

    Which is why, I expect, I really liked Grant Morrison’s recent run. Grant threw out the standard X-Men style—a gutsy move, since it was undeniably commercial—and substituted his own wild ideas in its place. I think Grant’s run followed the established pattern he’d set down in earlier series such as Doom Patrol and JLA—it opened with a number of electric, mind-blowing stories, settled in with a soft, flabby and somewhat self-indulgent middle section, only to pull a stellar climax together in the final issues. It’s the most fun I’ve had with the X-Men in a long while.

    And that’s why you really don’t want me editing many X-Men comics—the things you like about the book and the characters aren’t the things that work for me. (I’ll tell you this much: were she not already dead, I’d delight in dropping a concrete block on Illyana Rasputin’s head, so annoying did I find her Magik persona.)

    2014 Note: Illyana is alive again these days. Joy.

  2. #47
    Astonishing Member gonnagiveittoya's Avatar
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    The vibe I'm getting across various reactions is that the odds are good of the Mansion coming back in some capacity

  3. #48
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    Not really. Morrison has no connection with him compared to many of the DC guys who he's willing to work with (like Didio, Raspler/Tomasi, Marts). The former Marvel editor that Morrison has the most connection to upped and left the company after coming back post-AvX from DC.

    edit: And iirc GMoz came to Marvel due to Mark Millar. And that relationship largely became sour afterwards.
    Last edited by Bruce Wayne; 08-11-2023 at 08:24 PM.

  4. #49
    Astonishing Member Arachne's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red_Blaster View Post
    Some old comments from his tumblr (2003):

    https://www.tumblr.com/brevoorthisto...3?source=share
    I... don't actually disagree with most of that. I don't like it when a character hogs the spotlight, either. Unless he isn't just sore that Scott and Jean weren't the ones doing the hogging, I don't think I'm going to have a big problem with him.

  5. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by gonnagiveittoya View Post
    The vibe I'm getting across various reactions is that the odds are good of the Mansion coming back in some capacity
    The vibe I got was the usual posters just throwing out the word 'mansion' like it is code for something anytime any idea of something changing about the status quo. I doubt most of the 'reactions' are reacting to anything actually said by anyone that matters.

    Quote Originally Posted by Arachne View Post
    I... don't actually disagree with most of that. I don't like it when a character hogs the spotlight, either. Unless he isn't just sore that Scott and Jean weren't the ones doing the hogging, I don't think I'm going to have a big problem with him.
    This is the aspect of Brevoort I appreciate. His love of the characters and the medium is genuine and between all of the opinions of a comic reader is signs of someone who understands what makes comics exciting to different people.
    Last edited by cranger; 08-11-2023 at 07:14 PM.

  6. #51
    Jean Grey Scholar Mercury's Avatar
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    As I've written elsewhere and mentioned here before, to me, the impetus for the Fall of X is to take what I've gathered was a short-term plan (i.e., ~6 years tops) by Hickman—he seems to have planned to make the Krakoan experiment ultimately unsuccessful—and make it permanent. The powers that be have seen how critically and financially successful the age of Krakoa has been, and I don't think they have any plans of getting rid of it. However, I'm sure they want to streamline, further establish, and dedicate enough time to it for it not to be considered just another passing era. This'll make it better suited for film adaptation.
    Jean Grey in the words of Walt Whitman, from his masterpiece Leaves of Grass, "Song of Myself" (51 and 52):

    "Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself, (I am large, I contain multitudes.)"

    "Failing to fetch me at first keep encouraged, Missing me one place search another, I stop somewhere waiting for you."

  7. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anduinel View Post
    Serious question, since I don't keep up with the Avengers books - outside of Black Panther, who usually does have a black writer at the helm, is the Avengers writing stable any less pale and male than the X-Men's? I'm willing to see what Brevoort brings to the table, but I remember him pooh-poohing the idea of an all-black Avengers team until Ewing wanted to do it. So not sure he's going to be the guy who'll see the importance of representation.
    Oh, don’t get me wrong, we still have a long way to go.

    (Really wouldn’t hurt for them to finally replace that EIC who penned Shadow & Flame as “Akira Yoshida”, either.)

    But this is definitely steps ahead of the X-office under JDW. I’m not a huge Avengers person, so this isn’t remotely comprehensive (I’m mostly a Kate Bishop, America Chavez, Black Widow fan), but just from doing a quick search, under Breevort, in the past four years, we’ve seen Ta-Nehisi Coates, Kelly Thompson, and Saladin Ahmed with multiple ongoings, plus Margaret Stohl, Rebecca Roanhorse, Danny Lore, and Murewa Ayodele.

    Meanwhile, in the past four years, the X-Office has consistently had… Tini Howard.

    Leah Williams and Vita Ayala’s books were critically acclaimed - then both disappeared, except for a mini (X-Terminators) and a Marvel Voices intro.

    (I hear Victor LaValle is finally coming back, though, so at least that’s something.)

    X-Men Unlimited, however, has showcased some fantastic talent under its editorial - Trung Le Nguyen, Preeti Chhibber, and Stephanie Williams are some of my most recent favs.

    Quote Originally Posted by skyvolt2000 View Post
    The usual suspects tend to ask for justification of an all diverse team while trying to shame or use "sales" to justify the exclusion of said folks on teams.

    Yet Generation X, New X-Men Academy, New Warriors, New Mutants & Runaways found ways to be diverse. As did teams in Milestone and Wildstorm (before DC).
    Boom.

    Quote Originally Posted by Arachne View Post
    I... don't actually disagree with most of that. I don't like it when a character hogs the spotlight, either. Unless he isn't just sore that Scott and Jean weren't the ones doing the hogging, I don't think I'm going to have a big problem with him.
    Ditto.

    That’s truly been my biggest issue with Krakoa (well, that, and the lack of world-building from most writers outside of Hickman and Ewing) - you have the biggest catalog of mutant characters ever available to you, with both resurrection and the concept of Krakoa itself….

    …and yet the same six or so characters are on the cover of every single title.

    (Including a few he name-dropped. Oop.)

    And he’s a fan of Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol?

    Yeah, the guy has taste.

  8. #53

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    This isn't really a shocker to me. I've been expecting news of White on the way out since I think March-ish. I just didn't know who would replace him.
    I can also be reached on BlueSky and Tumblr. Avatar by kahlart.

    Ghosts of Genosha minicomic focused on Polaris, written by me and drawn by Fin_NoMore.

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  9. #54
    Moderator Frontier's Avatar
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    I don't know if Krakoa is going to end for good but I definitely think once Brevoort takes over we'll see a new phase of the X-Men as a whole.

  10. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sisterhood Of Mutants View Post
    Oh, don’t get me wrong, we still have a long way to go.

    (Really wouldn’t hurt for them to finally replace that EIC who penned Shadow & Flame as “Akira Yoshida”, either.)

    But this is definitely steps ahead of the X-office under JDW. I’m not a huge Avengers person, so this isn’t remotely comprehensive (I’m mostly a Kate Bishop, America Chavez, Black Widow fan), but just from doing a quick search, under Breevort, in the past four years, we’ve seen Ta-Nehisi Coates, Kelly Thompson, and Saladin Ahmed with multiple ongoings, plus Margaret Stohl, Rebecca Roanhorse, Danny Lore, and Murewa Ayodele.
    Appreciate it! That does perk my interest up quite a bit.

  11. #56
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    Oh no.

    Has anybody even liked the Avengers books the last few years? Sales haven't exactly blown the doors off the place. But I guess that's true for the X-Line too.


    Anyways, this sucks for Jean.

  12. #57
    Astonishing Member Exodus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitty&Piotr<3 View Post
    Oh no.

    Has anybody even liked the Avengers books the last few years? Sales haven't exactly blown the doors off the place. But I guess that's true for the X-Line too.


    Anyways, this sucks for Jean.
    Why is it bad for Jean? He was the editor keeping her dead for 10 years, right?

  13. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Exodus View Post
    Why is it bad for Jean? He was the editor keeping her dead for 10 years, right?
    Whether to bring her back wasn't up to him, but based on reading his thoughts on comics over the years, it seems he is of the opinion that Jean should have stayed dead.


  14. #59
    Astonishing Member Cyclone_Ablaze's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitty&Piotr<3 View Post
    Oh no.

    Has anybody even liked the Avengers books the last few years? Sales haven't exactly blown the doors off the place. But I guess that's true for the X-Line too.


    Anyways, this sucks for Jean.
    And Storm.

    The Sisters are in Trouble. Keep that man AWAY from Jean and Storm
    #StormNeverDied
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    In Ororo's Name....Let the Wormhole Open!!
    Ororo Munro: Regent of Arakko, Holder of the Seat of Loss, Omega Level Mutant, Goddess of Balance.

  15. #60
    Astonishing Member Grinning Soul's Avatar
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    Time to kill Jean for another 13 years and try to unsuccessfully replace her with every redhead and/or telepath under the sun, including a younger version of herself.

    Marvel never learns. Why do I say that? Because the 6 years between the Dark Phoenix Saga and X-Factor hadn't been enough to teach them.
    Last edited by Grinning Soul; 08-11-2023 at 11:43 PM.

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