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Thread: In Memoriam

  1. #1021
    Mighty Member Enigma's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scott Taylor View Post
    Prescription drug use went up an average of over 50 percent since 1999. Correlation alone?

    https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1103134804.htm
    It's a correlation until there is firm evidence of causation :P

  2. #1022
    Latverian ambassador Iron Maiden's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zetsubou View Post
    He wrote the Star Trek episode "The City on the Edge of Forever" which I watched a long time ago. It was a great story
    There's a great story behind that too. I read a book by Herb Solow and Robert Justman about the behind the scenes stuff from Star Trek. Ellison's story was rewritten several times by Roddenberry and others. The original story had a rogue Enterprise officer dealing drugs. Solow and Justman both agreed that the script as written by Ellison needed rewrites and was too expensive to shoot in Ellison story. There's quite a lot out there about the backstory. There's some disagreement as to how much it would have cost to shoot. The part about an evil version of the Enterprise called the Condor sounds like something the later did in the season 2 episode Mirror, Mirror.

    Acknowledged as the best single episode of Star Trek, “The City on the Edge of Forever” also was the show's most divisive. Written by the ferociously talented, mercurial Harlan Ellison, the original script follows a corrupt officer on the Enterprise named Beckwith who deals in drugs—literally, narcotics of sound. In trying to elude capture, Beckwith transports back to old Earth through a “time vortex” on an alien world and changes history. With the future altered—the Enterprise is now a predatory battleship called the Condor—Kirk and Spock, with the help of the ancient, monolithic Guardians of Forever, go back through time to stop Beckwith. On Earth circa 1930, they meet a WWI veteran named Trooper and a social visionary named Sister Edith Keeler. Keeler is the focal point in time. Intended to die, she will be saved from a fatal tra!c accident by none other than Beckwith, changing history...unless Kirk and Spock can stop him. But Kirk has fallen in love with Keeler. At the pivotal moment, Kirk freezes and it is Spock who intercepts Beckwith as Keeler is killed, hereby correcting the course of time.

    Robert Justman, co-producer of Star Trek, loved the episode—but agreed with Roddenberry that it was too expensive to be filmed. Now starts the controversy. The amount of the potential cost overrun is disputed by Ellison. Roddenberry sends the script through several rewrites from several rewriters. Ellison is livid. (He shares his side of the story in his incendiary The City on the Edge of Forever: The Original Teleplay That Became a Classic Star Trek Episode.) A vastly revised script, directed by Joseph Pevney, is filmed at last with Joan Collins as Keeler. Beckwith is gone; in his place, Dr. McCoy accidentally injects himself with a powerful stimulant that causes intense paranoia. It is he who escapes into Earth's past and changes history. The Condor subplot is erased, as is Trooper. Still, the episode gets raves and ultimately wins a Hugo Award. Ellison, however, wins the Writer's Guild top screenplay award—for his original script.

    In the years and decades that follow, Roddenberry publicly states, numerous times, that the revisions had to be made because Ellison “had Scotty dealing drugs” and because the original script's budget was, he says, tens of thousands of dollars too high. Among the people who dispute Roddenberry's version: Herb Solow, the Desilu executive in charge of Star Trek's production. In his book with Justman, Inside Star Trek, Solow details the trek of “City” from inception to filming to aftermath.
    There's also a copy of a memo from Justman to Roddenberry about the script problems and budget

  3. #1023
    Ultimate Member MajorHoy's Avatar
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    R.I.P. Steve Ditko.

    Steve Ditko, Spider-Man Co-Creator, Dies at Age 90
    By The Associated Press
    July 6, 2018
    NEW YORK Police in New York say Steve Ditko, who co-created the Spider-Man and Doctor Strange characters for Marvel Comics, has died. He was 90.
    Lt. Paul Ng says Ditko was found on June 29 in his Manhattan apartment and was pronounced dead at the scene. No further details were immediately available.
    Ditko, along with Stan Lee, introduced the world to Peter Parker, and his alter-ego Spider-Man in 1962 in an issue of "Amazing Fantasy."
    A year later, Ditko introduced the world to surgeon-turned-metaphysical superhero Doctor Strange.
    The adventures of Spider-Man and Doctor Strange have been turned into blockbuster films.
    Ditko left Marvel in 1966, and returned the following decade. One of his later creations was Squirrel Girl, a cult favorite among comics fans.
    https://www.nytimes.com/aponline/201...eve-ditko.html

  4. #1024
    Extraordinary Member Kirby101's Avatar
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    A Legend, a strange man, but a singular talent.
    There came a time when the Old Gods died! The Brave died with the Cunning! The Noble perished locked in battle with unleashed Evil! It was the last day for them! An ancient era was passing in fiery holocaust!

  5. #1025
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    RIP, Steve Ditko. We shall miss you.

    When I read some of his works on "The Question", "Captain Atom" and "The Hawk and the Dove", I was under impression that Mr. Ditko is a conservative. He also pencilled "Chuck Norris and Karate Commandos" comic book based on a cartoon. Chuck Norris is a Republican who voted for Trump.

  6. #1026
    Extraordinary Member Kirby101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zetsubou View Post
    RIP, Steve Ditko. We shall miss you.

    When I read some of his works on "The Question", "Captain Atom" and "The Hawk and the Dove", I was under impression that Mr. Ditko is a conservative. He also pencilled "Chuck Norris and Karate Commandos" comic book based on a cartoon. Chuck Norris is a Republican who voted for Trump.
    Ditko was a Libertarian deeply devoted to the philosophy or Ayn Rand.
    There came a time when the Old Gods died! The Brave died with the Cunning! The Noble perished locked in battle with unleashed Evil! It was the last day for them! An ancient era was passing in fiery holocaust!

  7. #1027
    Extraordinary Member Tendrin's Avatar
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    That's one of the things that's made Ditko a mixed bag for me.

    I love so much of his marvel work, but then I read some of the stuff he put into Mr. A down the line and it's just...

    Yikes, my dude. Yikes.

    There's no doubting his impact on comics, regardless, and we all owe him a great debt.

  8. #1028
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirby101 View Post
    Ditko was a Libertarian deeply devoted to the philosophy or Ayn Rand.
    Which is odd considering Spiderman and Dr Strange both began as exercising their talents largely for their own self-interests before being humbled into altruistic heroism.

    Then again I'm not sure how a libertarian superhero would even work.

  9. #1029
    Fantastic Member 4saken1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tendrin View Post
    That's one of the things that's made Ditko a mixed bag for me.

    I love so much of his marvel work, but then I read some of the stuff he put into Mr. A down the line and it's just...

    Yikes, my dude. Yikes.
    Yeah, same with some of Frank Miller and Mike Baron's later works.
    Pull List: Animosity,Babyteeth,Birthright,Black Hammer,Black Science,Damned,Deadly Class,Descender,East of West,Eternal Empire,Hellboy,Hillbilly,I Hate Fairyland,Injustice,Kill or be Killed,Lazarus,Manifest Destiny,Outcast,Paper Girls,Rat Queens,Saga,Seven to Eternity,Sex Criminals,Southern Bastards,Star Wars,Stray Bullets,Uber,Usagi Yojimbo,all Valiant,Walking Dead,Wayward,Wicked & Divine.

  10. #1030
    Extraordinary Member Kirby101's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wjowski View Post
    Which is odd considering Spiderman and Dr Strange both began as exercising their talents largely for their own self-interests before being humbled into altruistic heroism.

    Then again I'm not sure how a libertarian superhero would even work.
    Because even though Ditko was co-creating the stories, Stan, a liberal democrat, was writing the script.

    "With great power" was all Lee.
    There came a time when the Old Gods died! The Brave died with the Cunning! The Noble perished locked in battle with unleashed Evil! It was the last day for them! An ancient era was passing in fiery holocaust!

  11. #1031

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    I knew that it was coming, though I thought he might actually outlive Stan.

    Along with William Marston, Ditko can lay claim to being one of the first creators to engage with philosophical issues in the medium. Whether one likes or dislikes his philosophical stance is irrelevant.

    I wonder what the super-Marxist critics will have to say about his legacy.

  12. #1032
    Jesus Christ, redeemer! The Whovian's Avatar
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    One of the greatest comic book artists ever. Right up there with Kirby and the others. Prayers of peace for his family and friends.
    Favorite Artists Right Now: Ivan Reis, Andrea Sorrentino, Stuart Immonen, Jason Fabok, Olivier Coipel, Nick Dragotta, Kim Jacinto, Patrick Gleason, Jorge Jimenez, Greg Capullo, Jerome Opena, Steve McNiven, Jim Cheung, Steve Epting, Sean Murphy.

    "Some people live more in 20 years than others do in 80. It's not the time that matters, it's the person."--The Doctor

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  13. #1033
    Incredible Member C_Miller's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ouroboros View Post
    I knew that it was coming, though I thought he might actually outlive Stan.

    Along with William Marston, Ditko can lay claim to being one of the first creators to engage with philosophical issues in the medium. Whether one likes or dislikes his philosophical stance is irrelevant.

    I wonder what the super-Marxist critics will have to say about his legacy.
    As someone very far to the left, I have nothing but positive things to say about his legacy. Spider-Man changed the game. I would be willing to bet that none of us would be here if it weren't for Spider-Man. Regardless if you're a fan of the character or not, his creation changed what people expected from comics. Fantastic Four was small, welcome alteration from what was happening at the time, while Spider-Man was a radical shift. If he just created Spider-Man his legacy would be secure, but then he decided to create Doctor Strange too. While not as commercially successful, I would say, one of the true masterpieces of the silver age. Then he spent time creating characters that would be the template and muses for possibly the greatest and most successful comic book story of all time (Watchmen). Not only was he a strong creator, he was an influence that is nearly unparalleled.

    Had we met, we would have vehemently disagreed on politics. But, I wouldn't have missed the opportunity to shake the man who may helped save my life as a teenager.

    So now you don't have to wonder anymore.

  14. #1034
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kirby101 View Post
    Because even though Ditko was co-creating the stories, Stan, a liberal democrat, was writing the script.

    "With great power" was all Lee.
    Yeah Stan Lee wrote about environmental issues in comic book Ravage 2099 and the comic book adaptation of the failed Captain America 1991 film

    Quote Originally Posted by The Whovian View Post
    One of the greatest comic book artists ever. Right up there with Kirby and the others. Prayers of peace for his family and friends.
    Did he have a family? I thought he was single and had no children?

  15. #1035
    Extraordinary Member Tendrin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zetsubou View Post

    Did he have a family? I thought he was single and had no children?
    The one thing we can say for certain about Ditko is that he was private enough for us to have no idea. /To the best of our knowledge/, he has no living relatives.

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