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  1. #1
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    Default Joe Golem, Occult Detective: The Rat Catcher

    Mignola and Golden bring Joe Golem to Dark Horse Comics.

    June 29, 2015: This November legendary Hellboy creator Mike Mignola, NEW YORK TIMES bestselling novelist Christopher Golden and Dark Horse Comics will unleash the first ever comic book appearance of their character Joe Golem from their novel Joe Golem and the Drowning City. A five issue Joe Golem: Occult Detective mini-series will be co-written by frequent collaborators Mignola and Golden, with art by Patric Reynolds (Serenity), colors by award winning colorist Dave Stewart and covers by Spectrum Award-winning painter Dave Palumbo. The new series takes place prior to the events of the illustrated novel Joe Golem and the Drowning City. Set forty years after an earthquake leaves Lower Manhattan partly submerged under 30 feet of water, Joe Golem must hunt a horrifying creature that is pulling children into the depths of the city’s canals.

    “For years now, since we first saw Baltimore work as a comic, Chris and I have talked about doing comic book sequels and prequels to Joe Golem,” said Mike Mignola. “But, as always, we needed to find just the right artist and when I saw Patric Reynolds’ recent work on an Alien comic I knew he could pull off the world we created in the novel and capture the mood we were looking for. When you find the right artist for something you don't want to let him get away.”

    Like their collaboration on the Baltimore graphic novels, the events of Joe Golem take place outside of the “Mignolaverse”, the strange, shared universe inhabited by Hellboy, BPRD, Abe Sapien, and Frankenstein Underground. The horror of Joe Golem is distinctly urban; the series offers a haunting dystopian mid-twentieth century New York.

    "Joe Golem is full of pulpy goodness, weird alternate history, monsters, and magic and it's full of insanity you're not going to find anywhere else." said Golden. “We're telling the story of Joe Golem: Occult Detective, solving mysteries in the flooded streets of mid-20th century lower Manhattan with the ancient Simon Church, who's keeping himself alive with magic and machinery at the same time he's keeping Joe in the dark about his own origins. We want to immerse you in Joe's world, what life is like in the Drowning City, and with issue one, we dive right in."

    Mignola and Golden are currently writing BALTIMORE: THE CULT OF THE RED KING, with art by award winning children’s book illustrator Peter Bergting, colors by the award winning Dave Stewart and stunning covers by Ben Stenbeck (FRANKENSTEIN UNDERGROUND). Golden’s most recent novel, TIN MEN, was published by Ballantine Books earlier this month.

  2. #2
    Rookie Member mscorley's Avatar
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    I'm excited for this, figured it would come in comic for eventually

  3. #3
    Incredible Member topfueluhl's Avatar
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    Last edited by topfueluhl; 06-29-2015 at 10:44 AM.

  4. #4
    Mighty Member thwhtGuardian's Avatar
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    This should be awesome, I'm so pumped for this!

  5. #5

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    I love how pulpy Dave Palumbo's cover is. It's perfect. Also distinctly different from the Hellboy stuff.



    Quote Originally Posted by topfueluhl View Post
    I've never read the prose novel, but I'm excited to check out the comic book.
    It seems like the comics may eventually retell the novel too. There are certain sequences I am very excited to see Patric Reynolds draw.
    Last edited by middenway; 06-30-2015 at 12:24 AM.

  6. #6
    Mighty Member thwhtGuardian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by topfueluhl View Post
    You should totally pick up the novel, its a lot of fun and the follow up short story the Copper Girl is awesome.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by thwhtGuardian View Post
    You should totally pick up the novel, its a lot of fun and the follow up short story the Copper Girl is awesome.
    Actually, the short story came first. It was part of the promotional material for the novel.

  8. #8
    Mighty Member thwhtGuardian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by middenway View Post
    Actually, the short story came first. It was part of the promotional material for the novel.
    Ah, for some reason I thought it was a later addition. Still it's awesome.

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by thwhtGuardian View Post
    Ah, for some reason I thought it was a later addition. Still it's awesome.
    It is. I read it again last night.

  10. #10
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    So, guys, am I the only one, who thinks, that both Baltimore and Joe Golem are part of the same universe? There we some hint at that.

    Just compare:
    - In Baltimore plague ended WWI, in States people were left untouched and most of them don't even believe in vampires and other supernatural creatures, as Hodge stated in Curse Bells #1. In Joe Golem plague also ended WWI, in States people also were left untouched. There is no mention of monsters, because, I guess, nobody believe in them.
    - In Joe Golem major cataclysm happened in 1925, resulting in horrible earthquakes and other natural disasters. In Baltimore Henry is hunting Red King (1920 being current year), and what if he finally destroys him exactly 5 years later? Death of Evil God seems good reason enough for the whole world gone mad.

    What do you think?

  11. #11
    Incredible Member Kees_L's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shargor View Post
    What do you think?
    I'm not convinced either of these works, both as their followup installments, would neededly benefit from proving part to but one and the same universe just automatically.

    I like Baltimore, very much. And Joe Golem I will delve into as soon as I'm feeling ready to, which means the illustrated novel has been on its shelf-bit but I haven't found the proper time to do it justice. And the comics I'll be eagerly buying.

    I welcome the comics as well as I did welcome the novels, but part of the fun seemed to regard them as being as what storytelling examples they could be, without predispositions.

    Plus I like to keep whatever historic both as realistical references or themology as things to note. In case of European or be it American histories (both as any other) they'd exist to my mind as how they would, with obviously the connotation that prior to for instance America as having formed into how it would be now, all Americans will have been from other countries instead, since up to a point America only featured native Americans or such.
    Meaning that to a degree Americans would be sharing other territorial histories as prior to the more current American country existing at all. And meaning how reading on countries other than ones' own could still be perfectly doable. Themes or fiction based on such would or could be as viable as anything could.
    Whereas any long existing civilisation or country wouldn't necessarily be of the same incarnation of itself regardless. People or histories or nationalities never equate - really never.

    So I wouldn't be regarding whatever themes as either foreign or outdated necessarily, or as needing to be putting me off. Stuff could be to put me off, but as a reader or audience what would put me off the most would be just casting stuff aside too readily.

    Baltimore seems to bridge much thematic stuff, moreso than not Baltimore appears to internationalize histories, by proving readable and imaginable to anyone from anyplace, I'd say. And eventhough Joe Golem would be a New Yorker or an American resident - that doesn't seem to exclude anything much. One thing about either World Wars or communal histories to have knowledge about or be learning towards, would be that it needn't exclude as much as being to include much more rather.

    Same as how a monster or alien character needn't necessarily prove written for non-humans necessarily. Or who would read it?

    Even if a universe could be shared, it wouldn't necessarily mean it would have to be.
    I'm a Spider-Man fan although for me he's called *Lintboy*, a 40plus grumpy virgin who got bit by a spider at some tech lab. Part South-American in ethnicicity or at least in musical taste, both as knowing a good bit of cursewords in foreign languages. And he wouldn't know the Punisher or even Wolverine as being to exist. Or Batman.

    Along that note it seems to me that even if some stuff would share universes niftily - that wouldn't need to mean that any story or title would automatically be to benefit from such.
    I guess.

    I greatly appreciated learning that Joe Golem as a thing got developed from what used to be originally just some flimsy back-up plan - flimsy in the sense that likely nothing would ever come of it. A backup plan in case Hellboy would go flatfaced - and Hellboy didn't. So overtime Joe Golem didn't get discarded but had lingered on, for becoming something instead of nothing!

    And then I got reminded of how Hellboy originated or got developed from just this giddy con sketch on the back of some paper - resulting as proving the front bit once flipped around for good. How awesome is it that Hellboy was originally just this one lucky book. And then one after another, but never as anything automatic!

    The human mind - either as reading or creating - will be a fun place I imagine. As if every act of imagining creatively would be sharing a universe with fun - intended or not. A universe where that can happen - intended or not - seems pretty allright to me.
    Last edited by Kees_L; 07-09-2015 at 11:30 AM.
    SLINT / Mike Mignola / Walt Whitman / Arthur Louriť / Dr. Pepper

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  13. #13
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    I just finished the novel last night, and enjoyed it very much.
    I'm glad the comics are set before the novel, as the adventures of Joe and Mr. Church that are hinted at throughout the book and short story sound very interesting. I wonder whether the comics will continue past the novel as well, like Baltimore did. That would certainly be interesting.

  14. #14
    Mighty Member thwhtGuardian's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LobsterJohnson View Post
    I just finished the novel last night, and enjoyed it very much.
    I'm glad the comics are set before the novel, as the adventures of Joe and Mr. Church that are hinted at throughout the book and short story sound very interesting. I wonder whether the comics will continue past the novel as well, like Baltimore did. That would certainly be interesting.
    I hope they continue on past the novel as well as I'd love to see how the events of the novel changed the world.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by LobsterJohnson View Post
    I wonder whether the comics will continue past the novel as well, like Baltimore did. That would certainly be interesting.
    That's the plan.

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