Page 3 of 19 FirstFirst 123456713 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 45 of 280
  1. #31
    Astonishing Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,556

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by superduperman View Post
    This is exactly why I don't think stuff like this should be canon. Because it lets you explore ideas and concepts that we wouldn't want them to in the main books that might also scare off casual readers. s.
    Maybe I am playing devil's advocate here, but can be your perception about casual readers be a bit flawed? I mean, if I were a casual reader I would be way more intrigued by American Alien than any Superman incarnation in the latest, I don't know, 10 years maybe (at least, the ones in continuity). It's very close in tone and approach to several modern, mature comic books, like the ones published by Image comics, and certainly more interesting.

  2. #32
    THE MARK OF MY DIGNITY Superlad93's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    10,105

    Default

    I feel so dumb for not looking on the last page lol You're comment makes all the more sense now Myskin

  3. #33
    Always Rakzo
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Peru
    Posts
    4,402

    Default

    Speaking for myself, I'm glad this story is an Elseworlds since it gives Landis all the freedom in the world to develope his own stories and universe without having to worry with editorial limitations.

    On the other hand, I wouldn't mind if this was actually canon. This is pretty much the modern take on Superman I would have expected from this age, something that actually makes the character more understandable and relatable to this era. Is also exactly what I wanted from the Earth One line and easily surpasses JMS' uninspired work in terms of creativity, realism and boldness.

  4. #34
    Astonishing Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,556

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rakzo View Post
    Speaking for myself, I'm glad this story is an Elseworlds since it gives Landis all the freedom in the world to develope his own stories and universe without having to worry with editorial limitations.

    On the other hand, I wouldn't mind if this was actually canon. This is pretty much the modern take on Superman I would have expected from this age, something that actually makes the character more understandable and relatable to this era. Is also exactly what I wanted from the Earth One line and easily surpasses JMS' uninspired work in terms of creativity, realism and boldness.
    Everything surpasses JMS' Superman. Even Lobdell.

    EDIT: Even Chuck Austen, who at least wrote ONE interesting maxi-series, Superman: Metropolis.
    Last edited by Myskin; 12-16-2015 at 04:44 PM.

  5. #35
    Extraordinary Member superduperman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Metropolis USA
    Posts
    7,115

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Myskin View Post
    Maybe I am playing devil's advocate here, but can be your perception about casual readers be a bit flawed? I mean, if I were a casual reader I would be way more intrigued by American Alien than any Superman incarnation in the latest, I don't know, 10 years maybe (at least, the ones in continuity). It's very close in tone and approach to several modern, mature comic books, like the ones published by Image comics, and certainly more interesting.
    The reason why it's so good is because Landis has the freedom to do what he wants and the reason why he has that freedom is because it's not canon. "Official" versions of characters are very controlled. They need to be to make sure writers don't screw up royally and even then they don't always avoid that trap (See Truth). Earth One is a perfect example. Don't like it? Skip it! Just read the mainstream version. Having multiple versions out there makes it so that you can enjoy what you want to enjoy and gives creators the freedom to do things mainstream continuity won't allow. Now, I think that too many people know his secret in this version, and as far as anyone knows, that might actually be part of the larger narrative. Which means it could come into play down the line. He seems to be setting up a larger narrative for this whose purpose is to be revealed later on. You can't really do that with the mainstream version. Already Truth has come under fire for revealing his ID. Ideas that fans might be uncomfortable with in the mainstream universe they might find perfectly acceptable with an alternate version.

  6. #36
    Incredible Member taylortexas's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Posts
    534

    Default

    A lot of people are quick to dismiss Max Landis because they think he's annoying on Twitter. He's got a lot of opinions and is fairly passionate about every single one of them but even if you disagree with him, it'd be foolish to deny his passion and ability for writing. He's been an outspoken fan of Superman for years and so I was pretty excited when I first heard about this. Now? I'm just absolutely thrilled. I originally thought it was a shame that American Alien wasn't going to be in continuity but as others have stated here, I now see that this is actually one of the book's greatest strengths. Landis can really do just about anything... case in point? Reintroduce Doomsday however he likes!

    And that should be interesting to anyone who is familiar with Max Landis outside of this book. He's had some sort of fixation on The Death and Return of Superman for years. He put out a very entertaining short film about it a few years ago (here) and apparently even pitched a re-telling of that story to DC for the New 52 (here -- this is a long one!). So the fact that Doomsday is coming suggests that Landis is finally getting to put some long established ideas down onto paper. We're reading the work of someone who is truly inspired.

    Was this one darker than the typical Superman story? Sure. But you know what else this was? A coming of age story. A young boy discovering laser vision like girls for the first time. This book is tackling the biggest complaint I think I see when it comes to Superman: he's not relate-able, he's boring! And I doubt anyone in the Superman section of a comic forum finds that to be true but the fact is that's something that turns a lot of other people off of the character. If I ever had to recommend one book to change a reader's mind, it'd typically be All-Star Superman. Now? Well, by the time American Alien is over I might change my mind. Yeah, I'm enjoying it that much and suspect this is shaping up to be one of those great Superman stories people will look back on fondly for years.

    And I love the art too! Tommy Lee Edwards is killing it.

  7. #37
    OUTRAGEOUS!! Thor-Ul's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Halfway between Asgard & Krypton
    Posts
    6,218

    Default

    I remember that short (one of Elijah Wood's best performances, LoL). But back to topic I really has liked AA. And also like how is dealing but the growing of Clark.
    "Never assign to malice what is adequately explained by stupidity or ignorance."

    "Great stories will always return to their original forms"

    "Nobody is more dangerous than he who imagines himself pure in heart; for his purity, by definition, is unassailable." James Baldwin

  8. #38
    Spectacular Member Hopeful Hero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    153

    Default

    After reading the 2nd issue I have to say I like max's voice for clark's character. And honestly, I enjoyed both issues so far and he's already off to a good start with how he interprets the kents, pete and from what little we've seen lana. My minor gripe and even though I understood the context of it was the visceral heat vision. I get he couldn't control it properly yet it just put me off is all. otherwise I like how everything else was handled. It felt "real". Hats off to max for this issue. I patiently look forward to #3 next month.
    "So as I pray, Unlimited Pak Works!"

  9. #39
    Fantastic Member Tra-EL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    I know you're trying to find out where I hang my cape. YOU WON'T.
    Posts
    319

    Default

    You know a writer with creative freedom is good when Issue #1 and Issue #2 are completely different in tone and it still sticks. Page after page got better and better. I had no clue where the issue was going to end up and I loved that use of suspense. Issue #2 had me in the moment. The mood and setting were grim; dark and brutal..kind of reminded me of a Walking Dead type mood to it. A suspense creepiness flooded the panels and the artist pulled off the vision Landis had in mind. This issue worked so well and I could actually feel the fear of a small town and character driven moments that were totally believable. I loved the last page with Doomsday as well and I can't wait to see Landis's take on Doomy. This book, so far, represent's everything I want in a Superman book. Adventurous, mystery, unpredictable, creative, ballsy and full of anticipation. Very happy with this so far as it reads fast. Signs of a great book.

  10. #40
    Incredible Member napolid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    I'm in a glass case of emotion!
    Posts
    649

    Default

    I'm enjoying this series, with Pak and Kuder getting bogged down at the moment, it's good to have some readable Superman.
    Favorites: Batman, Superman, All-New Wolverine, Deathstroke, Detective Comics, Green Lanterns, Doom Patrol

  11. #41
    Fantastic Member Tra-EL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    I know you're trying to find out where I hang my cape. YOU WON'T.
    Posts
    319

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by napolid View Post
    I'm enjoying this series, with Pak and Kuder getting bogged down at the moment, it's good to have some readable Superman.
    Agreed. I found myself picking up all issue's of Truth (out of loyalty) and not even reading them. I even have the issue's I need to catch up on still in the brown paper bags my LCS stores them in. I have dropped Action and Superman and plan on picking back up probably at Superman #50 (that looks great with the meeting of New52 Supes and Pre-Flashpoint Supes.) The books I'm getting now are Lois and Clark; Bizarro, DKIII (I need to see how Supes is handled here) and American Alien. I'm flying through American Alien, though. I can't read this book fast enough. It's a book I've been wanting to welcome for some time now with any Supes title. Refreshing.

  12. #42
    Incredible Member Cowtools's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    700

    Default

    Well, everybody SHOULD be talking about American Alien, as this issue was fantastic. As chilling as last month's was heartwarming.
    It's remarkable how something that superficially has all the makings of a grimdark character assassination (Clark burns a guy's arms off?!) comes out instead as seeming very true to Superman's essential character.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dispenser Of Truth View Post
    Of *course* Clark had to be told to do good things as a kid. That's how you learn. If he just fundamentally knew down to his bones from the moment the rocket opened up what right and wrong was in any given situation, he wouldn't need Ma and Pa, or really any formative experiences at all.
    Absolutely right. All of us are who we are because of socialisation. It's only once we've grown into adults that we are fully mentally equiped to take full responsibility for our actions. No 16 year old could have everything figured out.

  13. #43
    Fantastic Member Tra-EL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    I know you're trying to find out where I hang my cape. YOU WON'T.
    Posts
    319

    Default

    I didn't like the fact that Clark needs to be told to do a good thing he would otherwise do himself. It's Landis' version of telling these things helped made Clark a good person. No Landis, he has always been a good person, he isn't lured into being one.
    I didn't see it as such. I think he's reluctant because of Ma and Ka's potential reactions and the way they parented him not to do what he's doing. The Clark/Ma Kent convo in the midst of the moment told you everything you needed to know why Clark seems this way as a young teenager. The "I wish you would act like any normal teenager" line was cut-throat to Clark and Martha knew it right away. Hell, she even admitted she was going to rip him a new one and Jonathan wasn't too far behind as he was livid. Even the Smallville police are protecting him so Clark feels he has this image to do right by them, not for what's right. Pete convinced him that it was time to let loose. Other than that, I think Clark's teenage attitude, verbal conversations and actions ARE that of the common teenager. I liked the voice Landis gave a 17 year old Clark. It felt spot on, even possible sexual advancements with Lana. That's typical 17 year old boy things.

  14. #44
    Mighty Member adkal's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    1,276

    Default

    Although I'm a little mixed on it, I did enjoy it. I think if the art at the beginning had been a little cleaner (the brighter colours in contrast to most of the rest of the issue help but it still felt a little scratchy) the effect of the art in the rest of the issue would have been taken up a notch. Still, the art was good - it had a small-town feel (even a bit of a Butch and Sundance), and the colours when, basically, a nightmare had come to Smallville...great stuff.

    Sheriff Parker trying to ask Clark for help but not quite knowing how to - this is a world where some of the people of Smallville know. They know and they're protecting him, and they're afraid for him not of him. Here, Sheriff Parker (to me) felt he was in over his head, and he hoped Clark would be able to help, but he didn't know how other than, perhaps, finding out where the people who had brought the nightmare to Smallville were holed up. He certainly didn't expect him (or Pete) to confront anyone. The helplessness that lead to him seeking out Clark worked. The resentment when Clark wouldn't help, worked. The guilt when realising Clark could have been killed, worked.

    Pete and Kenny knowing and being comfortable with it is, to me, a key component in this Clark's history (shored up with Sheriff Parker and Dr Pollard etc keeping the secret) because, as another poster said earlier, Clark has fit in. He has a place. He has friends. He has laughter, and teases, nudges, ability-envy, and so on. Yet, they have, somewhat naively, an element of 'miracle expectation'. Finding a cat is fine and dandy, but - well, the Hardy Boys and The Three Investigators used to take precautions, even if they did sometimes find themselves in dangerous situations anyway. (It does seem that Lana doesn't know, though)

    There is no easy way of finding out you're bulletproof - it's not something someone would actively try on themselves, no matter how durable they might find themselves to be otherwise - and getting shot in the face and having your nose broken (and then being told you could have lost an eye), dang.

    So the reasons for me being 'mixed' about this? I just feel Clark would have had more of awareness of his abilities (not the bulletproof thing) and would have told Sheriff Parker what he needed to know. That, likely, would have changed the whole story,though - with Owen and the others ready and willing to shoot at people, it likely would have led to a shoot out and the deaths of at least another three innocent people - so I can understand Landis not taking that route, to a certain degree, I just think Clark would have given Sheriff Parker the info he needed, and that Jonathan and Martha would have been totally okay with that.

    Anyway, two for two so far. Bring on issue 3.

  15. #45
    Astonishing Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    2,556

    Default

    The more I think about the issue, the more I understand (maybe) why Landis' Clark is so convincing and compelling. One of the plagues of Superman stories in the latest decades (maybe even earlier) is that the writers always want (maybe DC obliges them to do so) to fill the story with dogmatic assertions concerning Superman's holiness. Lots of pages focused on lessons about what is right and what is wrong. Even worse: lots of pages focused on preachy Superman SAYING what is right and what is wrong. I am rather sure that one the reasons behind the decline of the character is that the writers always represent him as an example. This is a bit contradictory by the way, because in the stories proper Superman never does anything particularly heroic, or at least nothing which another superhero wouldn't do.

    In certain cases - especially in stories written by writers who have a deep love for the character and therefore they don't want to 'taint' his reputation - this has created a short-circuit which have made Superman more and more unbelievable as a character. I like Mark Waid's Kingdom Come, but IMHO the whole story collapses at the end, when Norman McCay reproaches Superman by saying that his greatest power has always been his skill at instinctively discerning between right and wrong. Well, the whole scene sounded fake to me. Because up to that point, Superman has taken a lot of bad decisions. And I mean A LOT of them. Including putting thousands of metahumans in a gulag. But that would even be acceptable, because - after all - the story is about ethical confusion in modern times, and the contrast between a old-fashioned generation of superheroes and younger, wilder, metahumans. The problem is, I am constantly under the impression that Waid is trying to represent his character in a positive light, even when he is clearly wrong (and even if the only real sacrifice in the story is made by Captain Marvel).

    This is partly even the readers' responsibility, because they ALWAYS expect the best from Superman, even if character-wise it would be better if Superman openly faced his own contradictions and found a solution to them. Let's admit it, how many times did we see Superman facing an interesting, ethical dilemma, but the writers provided an easy escape for him at the very end, therefore avoiding any real confrontation? Even the celebrated (and justly so) Superman vs the Elite story ends on a flat note, because Superman hasn't really proven his point, he just demonstrated that he is more skillful at using his own superpowers.

    Anyway, I think that the secret behind Landis' story is that he is finally treating Superman as a character and not as an example. Everything is aimed at this - the style of drawing, the perception of the characters, the dialogues. That's why it seems perfectly natural and acceptable that Superman drinks beer, goes to the woods with his friends and has a sexual life (yes, Clark Kent has sex with Lana Lang, or at least is particularly willing to do so, at last). What we are seeing here is not Superman's path towards being world's greatest hero (a flamboyant expression which ultimately doesn't mean anything). What we are seeing here is Superman's path towards becoming a good person, in a world where aliens exist of course, but by following a path which we can all relate too, because in the same situation we would have probably done the same exact thing. And if Landis will ever write a story about adult Superman (I think that the Superman vs Joker one doesn't count, because it was basically a meta-commentary), I expect him to treat the character as wise, good, but sympathetic guy, not as the god of heroism or whatever.
    Last edited by Myskin; 12-17-2015 at 02:17 AM.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •