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  1. #1
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    Default The Russos Explain Why "Captain America: Civil War" Had to End the Way It Did

    Directors Joe and Anthony Russo delved into the reasons behind "Civil War's" conclusion and what it means for the Marvel Cinematic Universe.


    Full article here.

  2. #2
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    A couple of points about this:

    SPOILERS AHEAD:

    First, the film is very different from the comics series in a number of critically important ways. While the whole debate about registration runs through the film, the final confrontation between Cap and IM is entirely about a personal issue that has nothing to do with the accords and registration. Whether or not there was a debate about registration, the conflict would have occurred anyway. That is something that, I think, many people miss: the main story arc of CA:CW could have happened without the registration debate taking place at all. In many ways, that is actually a better solution than the mixed up mess the comics series became.

    In other ways, this is a good solution because, quite frankly, in the movie (and, to a lesser extent, in the comics) Cap is clearly in the wrong. His idea that "the safest hands are still our own" and that the Avengers should not be accountable or answerable to anyone other than themselves is incredibly dangerous and even fundamentally anti-democratic. In the comics, Cap was wrong too, but he had a number of better arguments. In the movie, Cap's position is, defensibly, seemingly based on his experience with SHIELD and it is understandable. But it is still a weak - and, as Rhodey says, "dangerously arrogant" position. Indeed, in the film, there is some indication that Cap realizes this. Before he finds out that Stark has had Wanda confined to the Avengers base, Cap seems ready to sign the accords, as long as there "safeguards." He is starting to come around. Then the thing with Wanda is revealed and he backs away in anger. The rest of the story becomes about Cap's efforts to save Bucky, which is a different story and in which Cap is, definitely, in the right. Killing Bucky for things he could not control is patently unfair. That battle puts Cap back in the right.

    Remember, too, that the entire conflict of the film - i.e, the framing of Bucky, the effort to destroy the Avengers from within - takes place because Zemo has lost his family in Sokovia. His means and actions may be misplaced but his anger, and the tragedy caused by superhumans running unchecked, is a theme that the movie hits several times and for which Cap has no answer.

    In the end of the film, Cap ends up in Wakanda. I don't think that the Panther has changed his mind (or his father's policy) about supporting the accords. He is helping Cap because he knows that he (the Panther) was almost manipulated into killing Bucky for someone else's crime. He is sympathetic to Cap's plight. But I sincerely doubt that he believes Cap is in the right on the registration issue. By then, however, the issue has moved far beyond registration.

  3. #3

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    A stronger ending would have been to leave Cap's supporters in the Raft prison, no last-second breakout. Just leave Steve and Bucky, wandering the Siberian tundra (or wherever that was), facing an unsure future.

  4. #4
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    If the situation were reversed and Rhoads was responsible for a loved one of Steve's death you can bet Tony would have done the same thing.

  5. #5
    Spectacular Member parker stark's Avatar
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    Both Steve & Tony seemed more in character here than in the comic version of this story. In the comic both were borderline villains, more so on Tony's side. In the movie you really get a feeling of the conflict in both & the regret of their loss of friendship. I hope the next time we see Steve it will have him as either Nomad or the Captain, and the next films have him reclaim the Captain America name & repair his friendship with Stark.

  6. #6
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    What's with this new trend of movies needing to be annotated? We had a spate of 'Snyder explains such and such in BvS' and 'Here's why Tilda Swinton was cast as the Ancient One' and now this? What happened to simply watching a movie on it's own merits, and leaving it at that?

    /rant
    ...Expecting the Spanish Inquisition.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by zhris View Post
    What's with this new trend of movies needing to be annotated? We had a spate of 'Snyder explains such and such in BvS' and 'Here's why Tilda Swinton was cast as the Ancient One' and now this? What happened to simply watching a movie on it's own merits, and leaving it at that?
    What? They dont have to. Some people just like reading about the creative processes behind the scenes. Others couldn't care less. It's not a new trend at all, in fact it's as old as the movies themselves. Not sure what your complaint is.

  8. #8
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    The way it ended was perfect but with lingering plot threads to carry over into the other films. Like what identity will Steve use in the next film? Nomad? The Captain? Ronin?
    Last edited by Redvector; 05-13-2016 at 11:30 AM.

  9. #9

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    I agree, the movie doesn't need explanation, but it's fun to hear what the creators have to say. I think the ending served the story well, and served the greater story of the shared universe better than a phony superhero-non death would have. As for the shield, gee, if only Steve wound up somewhere that has a lot of vibranium...

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hypestyle View Post
    A stronger ending would have been to leave Cap's supporters in the Raft prison, no last-second breakout. Just leave Steve and Bucky, wandering the Siberian tundra (or wherever that was), facing an unsure future.
    Why would they be wondering the Tundra when the jet they came in was still there completely undamaged? How is it a good move to have Steve abandon the people that risked everything and gave themselves up to help him escape?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hypestyle View Post
    A stronger ending would have been to leave Cap's supporters in the Raft prison, no last-second breakout. Just leave Steve and Bucky, wandering the Siberian tundra (or wherever that was), facing an unsure future.
    Come on, this is not a Snyder movie.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by CBR News View Post
    Directors Joe and Anthony Russo delved into the reasons behind "Civil War's" conclusion and what it means for the Marvel Cinematic Universe.


    Full article here.
    "We were saying to ourselves, the genre -- and perhaps the MCU -- has gotten to a point where the audience are sensing the patterns in the genre," Anthony Russo said of their approach to the film. "Joe and I have always been about: how do we subvert genre?"
    I'm glad they are aware of this. I hope Feige also understands it.

  13. #13
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    I was fine with the ending and the villain (surprisingly). I dug what they tried to do with Zemo. I won't mark them down for not quite shoring up his schemes. Most importantly, I don't expect one or thousands of people to die in every movie (but I think that needed to happen with Ultron). I liked that Civil War felt more personal, and friendships were at stake as opposed to lives hanging in the balance (although a few were put in danger). It was an opportunity for me to see what made characters tick, and that's what I came away from my second viewing appreciating. People who were looking for more than a personal, heartfelt conflict probably left disappointed, especially if they were asking for characters to be as simple as some others have been in superhero movies.

  14. #14
    Astonishing Member David Walton's Avatar
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    I loved the ending, which had both an anxious and upbeat quality about it.

    That moment where Steve is smiling as he frees his allies is sheer joy.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShaunN View Post


    In other ways, this is a good solution because, quite frankly, in the movie (and, to a lesser extent, in the comics) Cap is clearly in the wrong. His idea that "the safest hands are still our own" and that the Avengers should not be accountable or answerable to anyone other than themselves is incredibly dangerous and even fundamentally anti-democratic. In the comics, Cap was wrong too, but he had a number of better arguments.
    Absolutely not. Cap was right the entire time. About everything. The registration AND about Bucky. Becoming soldiers for whatever government happens to be in power at the time is not what the Avengers stood for as a group, or as individual heroes. Same thing in the comics. Iron Man's recklessness in the comics led to the creation of H.A.M.M.E.R and Norman Osbourne's rule. You can't possibly be serious right now.

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