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Thread: My artwork

  1. #31
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    Last edited by Joe; 11-23-2014 at 08:23 AM.

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  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharlesM View Post
    I love your work, even as there are numerous things about it that I don't like.

    Your lettering is terrible.

    If you didn't label the characters, I wouldn't know who they are. But, you could label them beneath the image, and not on the image, itself.

    Your art demonstrates that you comprehend that not everyone looks alike, that we don't all wear the same clothing or the same color of clothing. It also attests to your penchant for resorting to a very limited palette.

    Your characters are larger than life, but you have a tendency to make them all look very similar. Your work is best when it is not typical. Yet, time and time again, you give us work that is typical - characters become typical, and their depictions become typical.

    Your characters are at their visual best, when they are animated - as in, when they are doing something. You are capable of making your characters not look stiff, but then you go and give us a multitude of characters looking stiff. In the process, you end up giving us the equivalent of posers - mannequins simply posing. This is one of the down sides of focusing upon pin-up style art.

    You are only giving the viewer of your art a one-dimensional take on the characters that you are seeking to bring to life through your art. How many of these pieces incorporate weapons of some type of other? Is that all that these characters/people are about? What you're not depicting, as far as their lives go, is robbing you and your audience.

    Human anatomy is not your strength. But, you're on a tablet, which is a greater challenge than mastering anatomy with a pen or pencil (my opinion, not established fact).

    Mouths, particularly lips, are an Achilles' heel for you. You're not very good at rendering human hair, but you actually do a good job of depicting hair styles. This is actually one of your greatest demonstrated strengths, as an artist, based upon the visuals on display in this thread.

    Where environments are concerned, the settings that you surround your characters with, you spend precious little time and invest very little of your artistic skill in those environments - and it shows. If you have a ruler or other straight edge, then you certainly are not making good use of it. Just look at the lines on your buildings. Your work takes on an amateur quality, because of it.

    Your depiction of clothing has folds, which is a visual plus - but, you take it to excess. You seem to spend more time developing those folds than you spend developing the rich details of human anatomy.

    Your detailing is a mixed bag. That's why your depiction of shoes is better than your depiction of faces. Your art is bling-centric. You accessorize your characters, and your accessories (shoes, guns, jewelry, etc.) invariably end up drawing the eye better and faster than your characters, themselves. So, the bling and accessories become the main players in your art, rather than the people at the center of what it is that you are depicting.

    Your eye for the importance of color is vastly better than what your art reveals. In essence, you are better at understanding colorful, than you are at actually selecting and implementing color within your art. Your resort quickly and frequently to loud and neon colors. That is NOT a good thing. But, here's the part that gets me, you do it in such a way that your art doesn't end up hurting my eyes, if I just sit and stare at it. And that is a HUGE plus, visually speaking. What it translates into, on canvas, is that you have an eye for color - i.e.: you know how to present color with a visual balance, overall.

    But, because you make everything so damned colorful, you are drowning not just your art in color, thereby giving it an amateurish look, more importantly, you are robbing the central characters of your art of a great portion of their personality. To you, these people being depicted in your art are colorful - super-colorful, even. But, what isn't? In that sense, your approach to color is rather one-dimensional. Your art treats color like an on-off switch. What you need is a dial approach to color, one that takes into accounts the shades and the hues of color. It's not just about the color - it's also about understanding color, as a tool. As with art, where it's not simply about slapping down lines onto paper or canvas, likewise, with color, it's not simply about making everything all bright and vibrant and rich in color. You make frequent use of vibrant colors - but, go and step outside. The world isn't depicted in a color scheme so limited.

    Your characters have skin as vibrant in color as their clothing. To make them stand out more, visually, one or the other should be more dominant. It has to do with increasing visual contrast in your art.

    You want things to pop, though, I suspect. Yet, you would likely develop your control over the realm of color in art better and faster if you tried depicting colorful personalities through the pale medium. Then, your work would likely begin to present new opportunities to you,new visual vistas, when when you resort to loud, vibrant, or neon colors, your art would get more bang for the buck, more pop for the eye.

    On a separate note, have you ever tried doing sequentials?
    I didn't know what you meant by sequential artwork at first. That's why I edited my last post, but yes, I have plenty of sequential artwork laying around in my closet, art table, and drawer. I will show them in this thread in the future. Old artwork as well as new artwork.

  6. #36
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  7. #37
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    Some of the coolest stuff I've seen anywhere. It's right up my alley.

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  9. #39
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    I echo CharlesM's sentiments entirely; that is an amazing and wonderful critique. Well done!

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  11. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe View Post
    Some points about your most recently posted work:

    Goku VS Hulk is a very exciting pairing, however the way this piece is colored leaves it all feeling very flat and dull. There is no shading, gradients, or hue and value progression of any kind to be found in this work. Just flat, lifeless color. Generally, as subjects reside further or deeper into the distance, colors tend to become lighter and fine details are less distinguished.

    For example: http://tinyurl.com/lhmdcpo

    You notice how, in the foreground, the mountain/hillside is very brightly green, brown, yellow, and orange, and as the landscape winds it's way deeper into the painting, details become lost and that same hillside now appears blue? You can Google landscapes (both paintings and photographs) for plenty of examples.

    And as CharlesM mentioned once before, your grasp of anatomy needs significant practice. For instance, the big toe on Hulk's right foot is on the wrong side of the foot, and it looks as though his crotch has it's own six-pack.

    I hope this quick and dirty critique proves useful to you. Keep charging.

  12. #42
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    This guy has anatomy issues with his artwork, yet somehow managed to break in the comics industry.

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    This artist has anatomy issues with his artwork also and he is a professional.

  14. #44
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    Oh yeah and I'm pretty sure Rob Liefeld is the quintessential artist to look up to when it comes to discussing and practicing perfect anatomy in comic books. Rob Liefeld's artwork is still good regardless, and he still made it in the industry just off creating Deadpool alone. A professional told me that getting things done on time is slightly more important than perfection in the comicbook/cartoon/animation industry.

  15. #45
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    What exactly is the point of you posting your work, then? Are you putting these pictures up to stroke your ego? Are you simply posting things here to feel better about yourself? Pop in and scan a page or so of meaningless replies like 'Oh man that's awesome!', 'Sweet!', and 'Wow!'? Or would you rather get something back that is instead constructive, insightful, and authentic? Are you trying to improve? Do you care about getting better?

    In reference to your reply specifically - yeah, those guys may be professionals and those figures may be distorted. It was Pablo Picasso who once said: 'Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist.' Those images you posted are indeed not anatomically correct - but I would argue that those inaccuracies are not present as a lack of anatomical comprehension or artistic capability - they are drawn that way because those artists have very polished /style/. There's a big difference between not knowing something and not utilizing a particular skill set.

    Though, if all it takes is two honest critiques to make you butt-hurt, eh...

    Good luck, man.

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