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  1. #1
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    Default educational comics?

    Can you recommend me any educational comics or comics that teaches the readers anything about history, arts, science and society they didn't know or rather anything that people will find accurately useful?

    I know of a few comics and several manga.

    There is an old Fawcett comic book called "Bob Swift, Boy Sportsman" that ran 5 issues from May 1951 to Jan 1952. It narrates the story of a boy fishing, hunting and adventuring outdoors that may count as education about nature.

    Sumiyaki Monogatari (Tales of a Charcoal Burner) is a manga that details the laborious process of manufacturing charcoal.

    Munakata Kyouju Ikouroku (The Case Records of Professor Munakata) explains some interesting stuff about Japanese folklore and history tied to the folklore.

    C.M.B. Shinra Hakubutsukan no Jiken Mokuroku (The Shinra Museum's Case Index) is manga that has the elements of adventure, crime detective and archeology and which shows some knowledge of the history, traditions and cultural artifacts of several countries.

    In a historical fiction manga called Golden Kamuy, there are detailed explanations of Ainu lifestyle, customs, traditions, hunting habits and cooking methods. The manga also tells about the history of Ainu people and of the Japanese-Russian War.

  2. #2

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    The comics of Larry Gonick who creates comics that are basically textbooks in comics form.
    http://www.larrygonick.com/

    The Cartoon Guide to Computer Science (1983, Barnes & Noble; 1991 reprinted as The Cartoon Guide to the Computer, Collins, ISBN 0-06-273097-5)
    The Cartoon Guide to Genetics (with Mark Wheelis) (1983, Barnes & Noble; 1991 revised edition, Collins, ISBN 0-06-273099-1)
    The Cartoon Guide to U.S. History: 1865-Now (1987, Barnes & Noble; 1991 revised edition as The Cartoon History of the United States, Collins, ISBN 0-06-273098-3)
    Neo-Babelonia: A serious study in contemporary confusion (1989, Veen/BSO, ISBN 978-9020419290)
    The Cartoon History of the Universe - From the Big Bang to Alexander the Great (Volumes 1-7) (1990, Doubleday, ISBN 0-385-26520-4)
    The Cartoon Guide to Physics (with Art Huffman) (1991, Harper Perennial; 1992 reprint edition, Collins, ISBN 0-06-273100-9)
    The Cartoon Guide to (non)Communication (1993 reprint edition, Collins, ISBN 0-06-273217-X)
    The Cartoon Guide to Statistics (with Woollcott Smith) (1994, Collins, ISBN 0-06-273102-5)
    The Cartoon History of the Universe II - From the Springtime of China to the Fall of Rome (Volumes 8-13) (1994, Doubleday, ISBN 0-385-42093-5)
    The Cartoon Guide to the Environment (with Alice Outwater) (1996, Collins, ISBN 0-06-273274-9)
    The Cartoon Guide to Sex (with Christine Devault) (1999, Collins, ISBN 0-06-273431-8)
    The Cartoon History of the Universe III - From the Rise of Arabia to the Renaissance (Volumes 14-19) (2002, Doubleday, ISBN 0-393-05184-6)
    Kokopelli and Company in Attack of the Smart Pies (fiction) (2005, Cricket Books, ISBN 0-8126-2740-7)
    The Cartoon Guide to Chemistry (with Craig Criddle) (2005, Collins, ISBN 0-06-093677-0)
    The Cartoon History of the Modern World, Volume 1: From Columbus to the U.S. Constitution (2007, Collins, ISBN 0-06-076004-4)
    The Cartoon History of the Modern World, Volume 2: From the Bastille to Baghdad (2009, Collins, ISBN 0-06-076008-7)
    The Cartoon Guide to Calculus (2011, William Morrow Paperbacks, ISBN 0-06-168909-2)
    The Cartoon Guide to Algebra (2015, William Morrow Paperbacks, ISBN 0-06-220269-3)


    Joe Sacco who is journalist who uses comics to tell news stories.
    http://www.fantagraphics.com/artists/joe-sacco/

    •*Palestine (1996) & Footnotes in Gaza (2009) which are are Israeli–Palestinian relations
    •*Safe Area Goražde (2000) & The Fixer (2003) which are about the Bosnian War.

    Jay Hosler, Ph.D. in Biological Sciences, creates science-oriented comics mostly about insects and evolution.
    http://www.jayhosler.com/

    •*Clan Apis, published by Active Synapse, 2000
    •*The Sandwalk Adventures, published by Active Synapse, 2003
    •*Optical Allusions, published by Active Synapse, 2008
    •*Evolution. (art by Kevin Cannon and Zander Cannon) Hill and Wang
    • Last of the Sandwalkers published by First Second, 2015


    The March trilogy by U.S. Congressman John Lewis and Nate Powell which tells the story of the U.S. civil rights movement on the 1960's.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/March_(comics)

    The Persepolis series by Marjane Satrapi which tells of her youth during the Iran revolution.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persepolis_(comics)
    Last edited by Brandon Hanvey; 12-13-2016 at 01:41 PM. Reason: testing something weird

  3. #3
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    The 'Flash Facts' in Silver Age Flash comics taught me more about science than just about anything else.

  4. #4
    Astonishing Member dancj's Avatar
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    I second the Cartoon History of the Universe books

    also:
    Crecy by Warren Ellis
    Understanding Comics and Reinventing Comics by Scott McCloud
    Maus

  5. #5
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    Brandon Hanvey, It is a fantastic list. Thank you for showing it to me

  6. #6
    Ultimate Member t hedge coke's Avatar
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    Introducing Postmodernism: A Graphic Guide is a nice primer, though some of its interpretations haven't aged great and some (about action stars) were kind of dumb to begin with.

    Eisner and National Book Award-winner March is amazingly good comics memoir.



    Quote Originally Posted by dancj View Post
    I second the Cartoon History of the Universe books

    also:
    Crecy by Warren Ellis
    Yes!


    Quote Originally Posted by dancj View Post
    Understanding Comics and Reinventing Comics by Scott McCloud
    Maus
    Less big on these, I admit. Particularly Maus. Incredibly self-important, sued into revisions for ahistoric libel, and the funny animal thing is just lazy when it's not insulting to nationalities or the reader. He was criticized by the families of people he represented, and specifically asked during research trips by the Polish attache, to reconsider his use of the Nazi insult for Poles and very clearly dug his heels in and insisted that he had a right to decide if it was empowering or insulting, not, well, a Pole working for the Polish government.

    While much more fictional, to take on a comparable comic, I much prefer the honesty and gratitude of Joe Kubert's Yossel, a "what if?" in which his family doesn't emigrate to the States.

    On a more straight nonfiction front (which is more applicable to this thread), Fax From Sarajevo is remarkable.
    Patsy Walker on TV! Patsy Walker in new comics! Patsy Walker in your brain! And Jessica Jones is the new Nancy! (Oh, and read the Comics Cube.)

  7. #7
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    dancj, I will consider your suggestions, especially Maus.

    Introducing Postmodernism: A Graphic Guide sounds good. I will think about it.

  8. #8
    Astonishing Member dancj's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by t hedge coke View Post
    Less big on these, I admit. Particularly Maus. Incredibly self-important,
    I'm inclined to agree, but they fit the thread and they're very highly regarded so I thought I'd throw them out there.

  9. #9
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    A Marvel comic book named G.I. Joe A real American Hero by Larry Hama showed some knowledge of military-issue weapons and military vehicles. As expected of a former US Army firearms and explosive ordnance expert.

  10. #10
    Mighty Member C_Miller's Avatar
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    I haven't read it, but I look forward to reading March by Jon Lewis.

  11. #11
    Ultimate Member t hedge coke's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by C_Miller View Post
    I haven't read it, but I look forward to reading March by Jon Lewis.
    March is very good.
    Patsy Walker on TV! Patsy Walker in new comics! Patsy Walker in your brain! And Jessica Jones is the new Nancy! (Oh, and read the Comics Cube.)

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