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  1. #2776
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    Quote Originally Posted by charliehustle415 View Post
    First time!

    The first book was a little slow and I was wondering what all the hype is about but the minute he went to hell to find his helm and Lucifer wanted to keep him because dreams had no power in hell; Morpheus's answer floored me and I was hooked.

    I cannot wait to go through the entire thing and I am so happy that DC released the box set it makes it so easy to find and read.
    I have that same Sandman box set. Just finished the Death deluxe edition today. Pretty good.

    Gaiman is not someone one reads for the thrills haha. Even Moore does the occasional action adventure like Watchmen, Miracleman, Top 10, or LoEG. But with Gaiman it's much more muted. I recently struggled to finish the 3 Dark Horse Library editions of his illustrated short stories. Aside from the murder-in-heaven one and the Sherlock Holmes riff, the rest were a chore to get through; the same motif of whimsical fairy tale with a horror twist. I've also read American Godz, Graveyard Book, and Ocean at the End of the Lane. All fine enough works. But nothing that's ever gotten the blood pumping. I don't need everything to be snikty snikty stabby, of course; I did finish Moore's From Hell after all haha... But Gaiman is an acquired taste for me; have to be in a certain mindset to enjoy it. Most times I find his work boring. I didn't cotton to his Miracleman or Eternals either; really liked Marvel 1602 though as well as Sandman of course.
    Last edited by newparisian; 11-25-2021 at 03:59 PM.

  2. #2777
    see beauty in all things. charliehustle415's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by newparisian View Post
    I have that same Sandman box set. Just finished the Death deluxe edition today. Pretty good.

    Gaiman is not someone one reads for the thrills haha. Even Moore does the occasional action adventure like Watchmen, Miracleman, Top 10, or LoEG. But with Gaiman it's much more muted. I recently struggled to finish the 3 Dark Horse Library editions of his illustrated short stories. Aside from the murder-in-heaven one and the Sherlock Holmes riff, the rest were a chore to get through; the same motif of whimsical fairy tale with a horror twist. I've also read American Godz, Graveyard Book, and Ocean at the End of the Lane. All fine enough works. But nothing that's ever gotten the blood pumping. I don't need everything to be snikty snikty stabby, of course; I did finish Moore's From Hell after all haha... But Gaiman is an acquired taste for me; have to be in a certain mindset to enjoy it. Most times I find his work boring. I didn't cotton to his Miracleman or Eternals either; really liked Marvel 1602 though as well as Sandman of course.
    I hear ya, some issues were boring but that may be my modern comic reading sensibilities.

    I am liking it a lot simply because it is so fantastical, I will definitely keep going to make an over all judgement.

  3. #2778
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    Going into Sandman I already kind of knew to expect a more contemplative type of experience and whatever thrills were in there here and there were just the icing on the cake.

    It's really one of my all-time favourites and it's one of the few comic books I can actually see myself re-reading.

  4. #2779
    Astonishing Member MRP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foxy View Post
    Going into Sandman I already kind of knew to expect a more contemplative type of experience and whatever thrills were in there here and there were just the icing on the cake.

    It's really one of my all-time favourites and it's one of the few comic books I can actually see myself re-reading.
    I got in on Sandman when #8 was the current issue and read it as it came out from there. In subsequent years I replaced the floppies with trades and return to reread it every couple of years. I like some arcs more than others, and soem of my favorites are actually the one-off stories, but there is such a rich tapestry to explore throughout the series.

    -M
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  5. #2780
    Astonishing Member Johnny Thunders!'s Avatar
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    The short stories in books like Worlds End Inn are what surprised me the most. Sandman covers so many kinds of stories. I just finished American Gods, I had read the novel but this read was so good!

  6. #2781
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    I'm not a big marvel however I've always liked daredevil. So, I read millers stuff and I have skipped to guardian devil and now I've started bendis run. I plan on going right through from here .

    Bendis run is soooo good so far. I'm about half way through the first batch before there was a break in his run.. It's so good! Like it has potential to be an all-time fav. I also hear it gets better once bubaker comes in.. So I'm currently a happy af reader!

  7. #2782
    see beauty in all things. charliehustle415's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Foxy View Post
    Going into Sandman I already kind of knew to expect a more contemplative type of experience and whatever thrills were in there here and there were just the icing on the cake.

    It's really one of my all-time favourites and it's one of the few comic books I can actually see myself re-reading.
    Quote Originally Posted by MRP View Post
    I got in on Sandman when #8 was the current issue and read it as it came out from there. In subsequent years I replaced the floppies with trades and return to reread it every couple of years. I like some arcs more than others, and soem of my favorites are actually the one-off stories, but there is such a rich tapestry to explore throughout the series.

    -M
    Quote Originally Posted by Johnny Thunders! View Post
    The short stories in books like Worlds End Inn are what surprised me the most. Sandman covers so many kinds of stories. I just finished American Gods, I had read the novel but this read was so good!
    For me I only ever hear high praise about Sandman and how revolutionary it is and maybe I am showing my age; but to me it reads like a mature fairy tale.

    That's not a criticism it's just very fantastical with mature themes and stellar dialogue and high fantasy concepts.

    Nevertheless, I am enjoying it and maybe once I am done I will check out Gaiman's other graphic novels.

    Also I have read his book American Gods & Norse Mythology; the latter was a good retelling of classical Norse mythology and the former was a like an episode of Supernatural (I know the show took a lot of ideas from this book).

  8. #2783
    Astonishing Member MRP's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by charliehustle415 View Post
    For me I only ever hear high praise about Sandman and how revolutionary it is and maybe I am showing my age; but to me it reads like a mature fairy tale.

    That's not a criticism it's just very fantastical with mature themes and stellar dialogue and high fantasy concepts.

    Nevertheless, I am enjoying it and maybe once I am done I will check out Gaiman's other graphic novels.

    Also I have read his book American Gods & Norse Mythology; the latter was a good retelling of classical Norse mythology and the former was a like an episode of Supernatural (I know the show took a lot of ideas from this book).
    The thing with reading anything that is considered revolutionary or groundbreaking is you have to be aware of the before and after effect. Often those works are very influential and much of what comes AFTER them reflects what they have done making it the norm, so if you have read a lot of the after and then go back and read the groundbreaking work that started it all, it seems de rigeur because you have come to expect things that are now the norm, but were not around in the BEFORE period that the work in question emerged from. Sandman was revolutionary in its time because no one was doing anything like it before in comics. Since that time, its approach, themes, conceits, etc. have all become part and parcel of the comics landscape so it doesn't seem all that different when juxtaposed to the works that came after it. But if you read it when it was coming out, or before its influence swept through the field of comics, it certainly was revolutionary and changed the way comics were done. The fact it no longer seems revotutionary is a testament to just how influential it was and how much others followed the trail it blazed when it was being released.


    -M
    Comic fans get the comics their buying habits deserve.

  9. #2784
    see beauty in all things. charliehustle415's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MRP View Post
    The thing with reading anything that is considered revolutionary or groundbreaking is you have to be aware of the before and after effect. Often those works are very influential and much of what comes AFTER them reflects what they have done making it the norm, so if you have read a lot of the after and then go back and read the groundbreaking work that started it all, it seems de rigeur because you have come to expect things that are now the norm, but were not around in the BEFORE period that the work in question emerged from. Sandman was revolutionary in its time because no one was doing anything like it before in comics. Since that time, its approach, themes, conceits, etc. have all become part and parcel of the comics landscape so it doesn't seem all that different when juxtaposed to the works that came after it. But if you read it when it was coming out, or before its influence swept through the field of comics, it certainly was revolutionary and changed the way comics were done. The fact it no longer seems revotutionary is a testament to just how influential it was and how much others followed the trail it blazed when it was being released.


    -M
    Extremely well said.

  10. #2785
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    Brubaker’s run is very good but not in the same class as Bendis’s

  11. #2786
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charliemouse View Post
    Brubaker’s run is very good but not in the same class as Bendis’s
    Interesting. I'm almost done bendis run..it's been fantastic!

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